Bury Me, My Love | Play It On Your Phone

Bury Me, My Love | Play It On Your Phone

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Bury Me, My Love | Play It On Your Phone

by Dylan Blight


Bury Me, My Love from developer The Pixel Hunt was recently released for the Nintendo Switch and PC after it’s initial release on iOS and Android in October of 2017.

In the game, you play as Majd who is talking to his Wife, Nour, through a messaging app throughout her perilous journey to escape Syria and as it continues as she attempts to find refuge in Europe.

The gameplay is simple. You choose from various text or emoji responses to reply to Nour with as you attempt to help her make the journey safely. There are 19 different endings to the game; which should tell you just how much your responses will matter come the journey’s end.

Here’s the thing though: Bury Me, My Love on the Nintendo Switch is a boring game. To clarify I am saying this as someone who had BMML on their Top 10 Games of 2017 list.

However, and as much as I appreciate that the recent releases on new platforms -- especially for the Switch --  that can help bring the game to a new audience, let me help you out: play Bury Me, My Love on your phone.

The experience you get on your phone compared to playing on the Switch is not only a different gameplay experience but also a more emotional one.

Playing on the Switch: you will respond to Nour; she may mention having to wait for a Taxi and that she’ll reply soon -- but she’ll reply instantly. There may be periods where hours will pass as Nour does something, or sleeps, but the game will simply move the clock forward on screen.

When you play Bury Me, My Love on your mobile device, time moves in real time, and although you can turn this feature off on your phone, it is the way to play the game if you want not only the best gameplay experience but also the most emotional one.

My original playthrough of Bury Me, My Love in 2017 is directly associated to worrying about Nour and when I felt my phone vibrate hoping it was her over a Twitter notification or even a message from someone IRL. There was a point where Nour disappeared on me for a very long time and my temptation to turn real-time progression off was at its highest simply because I wanted her to come back and tell me she was okay. This is an experience you won’t get anywhere but playing the game on your phone. And I do think having the time to become more attached to Nour’s journey over the long-run is important to the emotional resonance of her dangerous journey, but the painful periods of waiting also help you understand what it’d be like to be Majd even more, sitting at home, worrying about his wife.

At one point in the journey, I annoyed Nour, leading us into an argument which ended with her leaving me for several hours to cool off. It was haunting how much those hours kinda stressed me out as if I had been arguing with a real loved one.   

Bury Me, My Love is a really interesting game because it offers a real hard look at the journey of a Syrian refugee and the hardships and prejudice that journey contains. It’s a game everyone should play. If you live in a country like Australia, as I do that so proudly has its government touting nonsense about stopping boats leading to stopping lives being lost, the game will offer a perspective that isn’t one mainstream media will give you. We’re all human. So I implore you to play Bury Me, My Love -- but please, play it on your phone.

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