All in Drama

Dunkirk Review

Dunkirk is unlike any war movie I have ever seen. It's nearly a silent film and features one of the most honest takes on war I have watched on-screen. There is no fluff in Christopher Nolan’s latest masterpiece - it feels genuine, respectful and brutal, without using realistic violence and blood to emphasise the direness of war, and particularly this moment in time at Dunkirk.

Ghost In The Shell

In 1995 Ghost in the Shell directed by Mamoru Oshii and based on the manga by Shirow Masamune was released, since then it's become something a cult anime classic. When I watched the film as a kid, I found it to be a bore, it's deeper questions asked about life and what makes us human was lost on me. Similarly the same year I watched Ridley Scott's Blade Runner, which I also found to be boring and its more minutiae details lost on me. Where both films featured action and cool sci-fi worlds, they asked deeper things of the audience. The 2017 film based on Masamune's manga is none of these things and it's boring to me for all the wrong reasons.

La La Land

You walk into La La Land knowing it’s a musical and having preconceived notions of what that means for this love story. The curtains open and suddenly everyone on a stalled highway is out of their cars; singing and dancing around one another. The pale gray and boring tone of the stage for this opening number doesn’t matter; everyone is wearing bright t-shirts and throwing themselves around like fireworks. Then the music ends, everyone gets back into their cars and the camera that hasn’t stopped moving yet, it slowly moves down to reveal our main characters sitting in their cars. You may think you are witnessing a broadway play or a recording of one, but this is La La Land.